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Hill & Associates Security Risk Management Corporate Intelligence, Fraud Prevention & Integrity Risk Management

Ridge Mursman 3 years ago 0

Business Continuity with Full-Spectrum Problem Solving.


We don't make headlines. We make success.

Doing business globally means exposure to risk. Landing in Asia should not feel like stepping into a threatening landscape. Our Asia-based team knows the territory, the players and the pitfalls. We guide clients around the challenges and insulate them from the unforeseen. Your business will never miss a beat.


We work with complete confidentiality in world’s most difficult and opaque markets. LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR SERVICES


Local


We are positioned across Asia to act decisively to crises and maintain the continuity of your business. SEE WERE WE HERE


Multidisciplinary


Law enforcement, military, cyber security, accounting, corporate law, and everything in between are represented. MEET OUR TEAM


Contact Us

+852 2802 2123

info@hill-assoc.com

Room 1701-08, Tower 2, Times Square, 1 Matheson Street, Causeway Bay, Hong Kong

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Bacall Associates Travel: Easy steps to include Social Media into Sales Promotions

Yair Wood 3 years ago 0

The tremendous impact of social media has brought to the business arena is phenomenal and Bacall Associates has been witnessing this phenomenon over the years. A social media campaign could add a cutting-edge facet to traditional sales promotions. Many customers prefer social media in looking for trusted reviews of different people about a particular service or product.


A well-designed social media campaign can be a powerful and effective sales tool as it enables your business to develop continuing relationships with your target audience and followers, and improve your understanding towards their needs.


Getting social media success usually includes a long process, particularly in small businesses, so you must flourish your profiles first and develop a genuine relationship with your business followers before easing into any type of sales promotions. The following are some of the easy suggestions prepared by Bacall Associates where you can use social media to your sales promotions.


Select the best platform for your business

Understanding on where you’re being found by your prospective customers on social media can assist you in determining on which platform you’re going to use for your brand. You can request your marketing team to report this information to you. But in the end, the platform should match your target audience. If your business is focused towards promotions and B2B then LinkedIn is an ideal option for you, but if you're aimed towards the consumer market then Facebook is for you.


Build a trustworthy image

This will not be easy, but you must do your best to build your business' creditability. You can begin with creating a professional profile and see to it that your posts and updates are discussion-worthy with only a small percentage of being directly promotional posts.


Properly handle gathered information

Social media provides an enormous quantity of data about qualified leads. A well-designed campaign using a combination of promo codes can provide many in-depth data, which is why most social media sites offer analytics to examine these data for future campaigns. It's important to correctly handle the data once these leads have been gathered.


Sell using social media

You can also achieve effective selling with social media. It is the best for daily deals or acts now offers. Encourage immediate action from your followers and motivate them to interact and share the offer, just make sure that it is a great deal to begin with so that they will be interested in sharing it.


If properly implemented, Bacall Associates is convinced that social media sites can be an excellent addition to your marketing and sales toolkits. Since 1994, the Bacall team has been providing comprehensive public relations, marketing communications, and sales promotion services to their customers.

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Hill & Associates Ltd Hong Kong Security Risk Management: WHO WE ARE

Ridge Mursman 3 years ago 0

Our Team

Our strength is the breadth of our Asia-based team and depth of local knowledge. Our staff of more than 150 includes experts from around the world in fields ranging from law, accounting and banking to military, intelligence and computer forensics. All adhere to strict ethical and internal codes of conduct. Discretion, effectiveness and professionalism make our team – individually and as a unit – your trusted adviser.

Meet some of our team members.


Neil Marshall

Managing Director


Neil has more than 30 years of experience in security and business risk consulting across Asia, Africa and the Middle East. He helps corporate clients manage internal fraud matters, labour and commercial relationships, and crisis and contingency management issues, working with stakeholders and senior management to create solutions that are logical, ethical and economically sound. Clients include top-tier Fortune 500 organisations during times of exponential growth into new markets and operations.


Mike Groves

Security Risk Management


Prior to joining Hill & Associates, Mike completed a 28-year career in the Hong Kong Police Force, rising to directorate rank. During his service, Mike commanded the VIP Protection and Tactical Units, and oversaw operations at events including the Handover of Hong Kong in 1997 and meetings of the World Bank, IMF and WTO. Mike works with clients to pre-empt and address issues that impinge on business operations and reputation risk.


John Bruce

Corporate Intelligence


John Bruce runs our Corporate Intelligence service line, which encompasses business intelligence and integrity and background checks. In addition to this, he has specific responsibility for gaming related due diligence, having become involved in the gaming industry due to the burgeoning expansion in worldwide gaming that took place alongside the expansion of the worldwide web. He has considerable experience in providing independent consulting services to companies in the gaming industry on the nature of the industry in Asia.

Adelene Wee

Fraud Prevention & Integrity Risk


Adelene has worked throughout Asia and has extensive experience in the practicalities of doing business – both local and cross-border. She is responsible for managing and conducting client engagements focused on the areas of fraud, bribery and corruption, ethics, corporate governance and integrity and compliance matters. Prior to joining Hill & Associates, Adelene worked in tax and legal services in a Big Four firm and in corporate and commercial law at several international firms.

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Who We Are? - Hill & Associates Ltd Hong Kong Security Risk Management

Bradley R. McRay 3 years ago 0


Our Team


Our strength is the breadth of our Asia-based team and depth of local knowledge. Our staff of more than 150 includes experts from around the world in fields ranging from law, accounting and banking to military, intelligence and computer forensics. All adhere to strict ethical and internal codes of conduct. Discretion, effectiveness and professionalism make our team – individually and as a unit – your trusted adviser.

Meet some of our team members.


Neil Marshall

Managing Director

Neil has more than 30 years of experience in security and business risk consulting across Asia, Africa and the Middle East. He helps corporate clients manage internal fraud matters, labour and commercial relationships, and crisis and contingency management issues, working with stakeholders and senior management to create solutions that are logical, ethical and economically sound. Clients include top-tier Fortune 500 organisations during times of exponential growth into new markets and operations.


Mike Groves

Security Risk Management


Prior to joining Hill & Associates, Mike completed a 28-year career in the Hong Kong Police Force, rising to directorate rank. During his service, Mike commanded the VIP Protection and Tactical Units, and oversaw operations at events including the Handover of Hong Kong in 1997 and meetings of the World Bank, IMF and WTO. Mike works with clients to pre-empt and address issues that impinge on business operations and reputation risk.


John Bruce

Corporate Intelligence


John Bruce runs our Corporate Intelligence service line, which encompasses business intelligence and integrity and background checks. In addition to this, he has specific responsibility for gaming related due diligence, having become involved in the gaming industry due to the burgeoning expansion in worldwide gaming that took place alongside the expansion of the worldwide web. He has considerable experience in providing independent consulting services to companies in the gaming industry on the nature of the industry in Asia.


Adelene Wee

Fraud Prevention & Integrity Risk


Adelene has worked throughout Asia and has extensive experience in the practicalities of doing business – both local and cross-border. She is responsible for managing and conducting client engagements focused on the areas of fraud, bribery and corruption, ethics, corporate governance and integrity and compliance matters. Prior to joining Hill & Associates, Adelene worked in tax and legal services in a Big Four firm and in corporate and commercial law at several international firms.

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Hill & Associates Ltd Hong Kong Security Risk Management

wallycournier 3 years ago 0

What We Do

Operating in a volatile business environment means challenges can spring up without warning. Deep local knowledge allows us to react swiftly and effectively, no matter where, how or why the crisis has arisen.

We have helped our clients:

  • Carry out a series of threat, vulnerability and risk assessments across a portfolio of hotels
  • Design and train crisis management plans for relevant business risks covering information or cyber security, fires, floods, medical emergencies, earthquakes, civil unrest and bomb/terror threats
  • Manage security and logistics for a corporate event with thousands of attendees
  • Protect personnel during periods of transition, downsizing and restructuring
  • Assess locations and evaluate facilities’ access points, perimeter and environment
  • Provide comprehensive crisis planning, training and including risk assessments for many international schools across Asia

Our Capabilities

Security Risk Management

Crisis Management

- Risk Assessment & Contingency Planning

- Crisis Management Training & Support

- Business Continuity Risk Management

Operations & Facility Risk

- Threat, Vulnerability & Risk Assessment (TVRA)

- Security Review

- Technical Security Design

- Capital Projects Risk Management

- Supply Chain Risk Management

- Technical Surveillance Countermeasure (TSCM) Services

Travel & Event Risk Management

- Risk Assessment & Review

- Travel Facilitation & Support

- Venue and Event Planning & Support

- Executive, Personal & Family Protection

Corporate Intelligence

Counterparty Risk

- Due Diligence and Investment Appraisal

- Strategic & Market Intelligence

- Executive Profiling and Vendor Screening

- Pre-Employment Screening

- Shareholder Action Services

- Litigation Support

Fraud Prevention & Integrity Risk Management

Integrity Risk

- Fraud & Compliance Risk Training and Management

- Fraud and Corruption Enquiries

- Litigation Support

Brand & IP Risk

- Risk Assessment and Controls Review

- IP & Trade Secret Protection

- Intelligence Gathering and Analysis

- Program Design and Enforcement Actions

Risk Information

  • GIS (Global Intelligence Service)
  • Country Risk Reports
  • Commissioned Reporting

Cyber Security


Cyber / Information Security

- Incident Response and Planning

- Bespoke Advisory Services

- Risk Assessment, Controls and Security Review

- Technical Security Design

- Cyber Situational Awareness

- Threat Intelligence

- Training and Workshops

- Perimeter & System Hardening and Application Security Testing

- Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Assessments

- Digital Due Diligence, Expert Witness Services

- Computer Forensics and Digital Preservation

- Data Recovery and Secure Destruction

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Hill & Associates - Security Risk Management: What We Do

Winema Gaven 3 years ago • updated 3 years ago 0



Operating in a volatile business environment means challenges can spring up without warning. Deep local knowledge allows us to react swiftly and effectively, no matter where, how or why the crisis has arisen.

We have helped our clients:

  • Carry out a series of threat, vulnerability and risk assessments across a portfolio of hotels
  • Design and train crisis management plans for relevant business risks covering information or cyber security, fires, floods, medical emergencies, earthquakes, civil unrest and bomb/terror threats
  • Manage security and logistics for a corporate event with thousands of attendees
  • Protect personnel during periods of transition, downsizing and restructuring
  • Assess locations and evaluate facilities’ access points, perimeter and environment
  • Provide comprehensive crisis planning, training and including risk assessments for many international schools across Asia

Our Capabilities


Security Risk Management

Crisis Management

- Risk Assessment & Contingency Planning

- Crisis Management Training & Support

- Business Continuity Risk Management

Operations & Facility Risk

- Threat, Vulnerability & Risk Assessment (TVRA)

- Security Review

- Technical Security Design

- Capital Projects Risk Management

- Supply Chain Risk Management

- Technical Surveillance Countermeasure (TSCM) Services

Travel & Event Risk Management

- Risk Assessment & Review

- Travel Facilitation & Support

- Venue and Event Planning & Support

- Executive, Personal & Family Protection

Corporate Intelligence

Counterparty Risk

- Due Diligence and Investment Appraisal

- Strategic & Market Intelligence

- Executive Profiling and Vendor Screening

- Pre-Employment Screening

- Shareholder Action Services

- Litigation Support

Fraud Prevention & Integrity Risk Management

Integrity Risk

- Fraud & Compliance Risk Training and Management

- Fraud and Corruption Enquiries

- Litigation Support

Brand & IP Risk

- Risk Assessment and Controls Review

- IP & Trade Secret Protection

- Intelligence Gathering and Analysis

- Program Design and Enforcement Actions

Risk Information

  • GIS (Global Intelligence Service)
  • Country Risk Reports
  • Commissioned Reporting

Cyber Security

Cyber / Information Security

- Incident Response and Planning

- Bespoke Advisory Services

- Risk Assessment, Controls and Security Review

- Technical Security Design

- Cyber Situational Awareness

- Threat Intelligence

- Training and Workshops

- Perimeter & System Hardening and Application Security Testing

- Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Assessments

- Digital Due Diligence, Expert Witness Services

- Computer Forensics and Digital Preservation

- Data Recovery and Secure Destruction

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How to Protect Yourself from Online Travel Booking Scams by Bacall Associates

Katty Mcqueen 3 years ago 0

Thanks to the Internet, booking travel online is simple. But as your ideas of a spring break or summer vacation take shape, remember to be cautious when making reservations online. The number of phony travel booking websites is growing because they’re so successful at scamming consumers. Learn what to do so you don’t take a quick trip to Fraudville instead of your dream destination.




Fake Travel Reservation Websites


According to estimates by the American Hotel & Lodging Association approximately 15 million online hotel reservations are made on bogus third-party sites every year. These rogue websites trick people into thinking they’re reserving directly with their hotel of choice. Instead, the victims are making reservations on phony sites set up to steal their money, credit card information, and dreams of a relaxing overnight stay. With cybercriminals pocketing more than $1.3 billion in fake hotel reservations, consumers need to beware when booking hotel rooms and other travel reservations online — such as for airline flights and rental cars, too.


How to Avoid Online Travel Reservation Scams


  1. Go directly to the official website of the hotel, airline, or rental car agency to book your reservations. It should have “HTTPS” in the URL. If you’re not sure you’re on a real site, call the company to verify. Or try Norton Safe Web to find out if a website is safe, for free.
  2. If you decide to use a third-party site, choose a well-known and reputable brand.
  3. Get recommendations for trusted travel companies or sites from your network of friends and family. If you’re ever uncertain about if a company is legitimate, check with the Better Business Bureau (link is external).
  4. Use a credit card instead of a debit card to book online. In case the website is phony, you won’t have given the cybercriminals direct access to your bank account. Many credit card companies offer fraud protection.
  5. After you make an online reservation, always call the company afterward to confirm. If there is no record of your reservation, it’s better to know sooner rather than later. You’ll be able to alert your credit card company, report the fraud, and still have time to book reservations with the real deal.
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How to Avoid Holiday Booking Online scams by Bacall Associates

R3ulxd814V7F 3 years ago 0



As the UK hits the busiest time of the year for holiday bookings, experts are warning consumers about the dangers of fraudulent travel company websites and other holiday scams. Abta, the Travel Association, has produced a list of warning signs for consumers to look out for, to help reduce the risk of falling foul of bogus sites.


If a website you are looking at has a combination of the following signs, it may be an indication that it’s not to be trusted …


  • Flight or holiday prices that are considerably cheaper than competitors. Flight prices are largely set by airlines, so although agents have some leeway in price, if the agent you’re contacting is charging significantly less than everyone else, this could be a sign that something is not quite right.
  • The average loss to the individual was £889, while one person lost £62,000 in a timeshare fraud
  • Low resolution, “fuzzy” logos for trade associations and credit card companies.
  • The only payment option is a bank transfer. Not only is this an indication that no bank is prepared to provide credit card facilities, but if you are dealing with a scammer it will be virtually impossible to get your money back.
  • Non-receipt of tickets – constantly being “fobbed off”.

Abta also advise consumers to do an online search before booking to check the profile of the company. If the company has been defrauding people, or has a bad reputation, there is a good chance consumers will have posted details or warnings about the company.


Other advice offered to stay safe when booking online is to:


  • Check the web address is legitimate and has not been altered by slight changes to a domain name, such as going from .co.uk to .org. You can also check the details of the domain name of the website at who.is – when was it registered? Recently could indicate an issue, while if the address is anonymous and information about the person or organisation that registered it cannot be viewed that could also be a warning sign.
  • Check whether the company is a member of a recognised trade body such as Abta or Atol. You can verify membership of Abta online at abta.com.
  • Check the paperwork – you should study receipts, invoices and terms and conditions, and be wary of companies that don’t provide any.
  • Use your instincts; if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Holiday fraud led to an estimated £7m being stolen from consumers in 2014, according to a report released by the City of London Police National Fraud Intelligence Bureau in April, with £2.2m lost to online scams. The average loss to the individual was £889, while one individual lost £62,000 in a fraud relating to timeshare.


The report also detailed the emotional toll for victims: one third said the fraud had a substantial impact on their health as well as their financial well-being, while 167 were affected so badly they had to receive medical treatment.


According to the report, the most common types of fraud related to holiday accommodation, in which fraudsters set up fake websites and posted fake ads online, as well as fake airline bookings and bookings related to high-profile sport and religious trips, such as the World Cup or Hajj.


Stuart Fuller, director of commercial operations at online brand protection company NetNames, said professional-looking websites can be set up easily, using rudimentary coding skills. Fraudsters can also leave fake online reviews on sites such as Tripadvisor to help exploit the trust of consumers.


“Unfortunately, often victims do not discover they have been duped until arriving at the airport or hotel only to find there is no booking,” he said.


John de Vial, head of financial protection at ABTA said: “Our consumer helpline has seen an increase in calls from members of the public who are either checking the validity of a suspicious website or, worse, have already paid by bank transfer and then been fobbed off when trying to get hold of their tickets. We want to make consumers aware of this problem and stop them from being ripped off in this way.”

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Bacall Associates: Booking Online - Airline & Hotel Travel Scams

Ariel Spooner 3 years ago 0

While booking plane tickets and hotel rooms can be pretty straightforward, it’s important to know exactly who you’re dealing with. At first glance, some websites may seem like the real deal, but they’re not. Peter Greenberg explains how to recognize when a site is running a scam—and gives his advice on how you can avoid them.


Online Hotel Booking Scams


Every day, American consumers book 480 hote l rooms per minute online. A majority of those online bookings are done through reputable OTAs—Online Travel Agencies—such as Expedia, Orbitz, Travelocity, and Kayak.


But a growing number of bookings are made on confusing third party websites that sound legitimate, but aren’t. There are about 2.5 million questionable bookings, representing more than $220 million in revenue.


It all comes down to websites that often pop up as paid advertising in search results and appear—some say in a deceptive way—similar to a hotel’s actual booking website. Many even prominently display hotel logos while minimizing the appearance of their own logos.


Essentially, these are third party websites trying to pass themselves off as actual hotels. So a growing number of consumers think they are booking a room directly at a Hilton hotel—offering great reduced rates—and it turns out they’re totally out of luck.


The images on the website may look like a brand such as a Hilton created them—as well as the quoted rate. But if you study the top of the ad, the number listed is not for the hotel, but rather for the third party website. So you may think you’re calling the hotel, but in reality, you’re not.


Then you arrive at the hotel to discover your reservation never actually existed, or the room you asked for doesn’t exist…even though you’ve already paid for the room.


Or, you may have a valid room reservation, but then discover that the hotel never got your request for two double beds, or a no smoking room or a handicapped accessible room. Worse, the rate you were quoted doesn’t exist, but your credit card was charged.


Or you find out you then can’t cancel the reservation, and these sites rarely have customer service centers.


Some go by the name of “reservation-desk.com/hilton,” or “Hilton.reservationcounter.com.” At first glance it seems like these websites belong to Hilton, but they don’t.


Translation: the AHLA (American Hotel and Lodging Association) claims that these third party websites are attempting to pass themselves off as the actual hotel. Earlier this week, five members of Congress sent a letter to the U.S. Department of Justice asking them to investigate the ongoing problem.


Peter’s Advice


Understand what a third party website is. Expedia, Priceline, and Hotels.com are not third party sites, they are aggregators that get their inventory directly from the hotels themselves.


Watch what happens when you search online. More often than not, these questionable websites show up in search results as paid ads. Do not click on them.


This can also apply to 1-800 toll-free numbers for “reservation centers” that want you to think you are calling Marriott, for example. But they are simply a third party site that will offer to make you a reservation for a Marriott.


Red flag.


The economic reality here is that the mainline hotels want you to book their websites only—let’s not forget there’s a profit motive here. What I am telling you to do is this: before you book on any third party website, have a conversation directly with the hotel itself. Ask them to verify that the website is valid, and perhaps just as important, that the rate they are offering is also valid.


Since room inventory changes by the minute at most hotels—remember, an unsold room is revenue the hotel will never recoup once the sun rises—you might just find that a phone conversation results in a much better rate, and you can skip the websites all together.

One other caveat: when booking a hotel room, it’s not just about the rate. It’s also about the conversation. Once you establish a rate you want to pay, the conversation isn’t over, it’s just getting started. Will the hotel throw in free Wi-Fi? Can your kids stay for free? Eat for free? Will the hotel waive the resort fee, or throw in free parking?


In an Internet world, my experience tells me that while it’s okay to research your travel online, it’s still essential to have the conversation—and with the hotel directly, not a third party reservation center.


The Airline Ticket Scam


Like the hotel booking problem, these online scams—which most recently surfaced in late 2013—are counting on logo and brand confusion.


Here’s how it works. You receive an official-looking letter—on official-looking letterhead from what appears to be a well known airline—claiming that you “have qualified for an award of two round-trip airline tickets. Congratulations. These tickets are valid for travel anywhere in the continental U.S. from any major international airport. The retail value of the award is $1400…”

To further motivate you, the letter says that the company has attempted to contact you many times without success and that they will have to offer the tickets to someone else. Then you are instructed to call a toll-free number to “claim” your award. If you do, there’s a small processing fee you’ll need to pay with your credit card.


Don’t do it.


Now, look more closely at the letter. The typeface of the letterhead looks real, but it was sent by “American Airways”, or “US Airlines.”


One small problem. Those airline names DO NOT EXIST. It’s American AIRLINES and US AIRWAYS, which means it’s a total scam. Yet, a lot of people fall for it. Why? It’s the continuing power and allure of travel, something most of us love to do.


But there are several rules you need to follow on these hotel and ticket scams….and it usually involves making just one very important phone call.


Peter’s Advice


It’s always good to research hotel rates and airline fares online. But before you hit “send” along with your credit card information, call the hotel directly—not the number listed on the website or letter, which may only go to that third party website.


Confirm both the validity of the website as well as the deal itself. The same thing applies to the airline ticket “offer.”


Any time you’re asked to use your credit card to “process” something that you’ve ostensibly won, that’s a clear warning that you’re about to be scammed. Call the airline and get them to confirm the actual “promotion” or sweepstakes. Nine times out of ten, there IS no promotion or sweepstakes.

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Holiday Scams: The Dangers and How to Avoid them by Bacall Associates

Yair Wood 3 years ago 0

As holiday bookings reach their new year peak, consumers are warned to look out for fraudulent travel websites and other holiday scams


As the UK hits the busiest time of the year for holiday bookings, experts are warning consumers about the dangers of fraudulent travel company websites and other holiday scams. Abta, the Travel Association, has produced a list of warning signs for consumers to look out for, to help reduce the risk of falling foul of bogus sites.


If a website you are looking at has a combination of the following signs, it may be an indication that it’s not to be trusted …


  • Flight or holiday prices that are considerably cheaper than competitors. Flight prices are largely set by airlines, so although agents have some leeway in price, if the agent you’re contacting is charging significantly less than everyone else, this could be a sign that something is not quite right.
  • Low resolution, “fuzzy” logos for trade associations and credit card companies.
  • The only payment option is a bank transfer. Not only is this an indication that no bank is prepared to provide credit card facilities, but if you are dealing with a scammer it will be virtually impossible to get your money back.
  • Non-receipt of tickets – constantly being “fobbed off”.

Abta also advise consumers to do an online search before booking to check the profile of the company. If the company has been defrauding people, or has a bad reputation, there is a good chance consumers will have posted details or warnings about the company.


Other advice offered to stay safe when booking online is to:




  • Check the web address is legitimate and has not been altered by slight changes to a domain name, such as going from .co.uk to .org. You can also check the details of the domain name of the website at who.is – when was it registered? Recently could indicate an issue, while if the address is anonymous and information about the person or organisation that registered it cannot be viewed that could also be a warning sign.
  • Check whether the company is a member of a recognised trade body such as Abta or Atol. You can verify membership of Abta online at abta.com.
  • Check the paperwork – you should study receipts, invoices and terms and conditions, and be wary of companies that don’t provide any.
  • Use your instincts; if something sounds too good to be true, it probably is.

Holiday fraud led to an estimated £7m being stolen from consumers in 2014, according to a report released by the City of London Police National Fraud Intelligence Bureau in April, with £2.2m lost to online scams. The average loss to the individual was £889, while one individual lost £62,000 in a fraud relating to timeshare.


The report also detailed the emotional toll for victims: one third said the fraud had a substantial impact on their health as well as their financial well-being, while 167 were affected so badly they had to receive medical treatment.


According to the report, the most common types of fraud related to holiday accommodation, in which fraudsters set up fake websites and posted fake ads online, as well as fake airline bookings and bookings related to high-profile sport and religious trips, such as the World Cup or Hajj.


Stuart Fuller, director of commercial operations at online brand protection company NetNames, said professional-looking websites can be set up easily, using rudimentary coding skills. Fraudsters can also leave fake online reviews on sites such as Tripadvisor to help exploit the trust of consumers.


“Unfortunately, often victims do not discover they have been duped until arriving at the airport or hotel only to find there is no booking,” he said.


John de Vial, head of financial protection at ABTA said: “Our consumer helpline has seen an increase in calls from members of the public who are either checking the validity of a suspicious website or, worse, have already paid by bank transfer and then been fobbed off when trying to get hold of their tickets. We want to make consumers aware of this problem and stop them from being ripped off in this way.”